Hi Ranjan.  If you're doing this on your own development node, or a
production node you're in full control of, you can add a root password to
ZooKeeper in order to blow away any nodes you like. Here's a little writeup
I did about it:

ZooKeeper has security features built into it by way of access control
lists (ACLs) on nodes.  Once set, these ACLs can be very hard to get rid
of, especially if errant code has set up nodes that you no longer have any
password for.  This how-to guide shows you how to set up a root user inside
of ZooKeeper that can wipe out any ACLed node.
Step-by-step guide

   1. Stop your currently running ZooKeeper.  This is either a direct
$ZOOKEEPER_HOME/bin/zkServer.sh
   stop command or a sudo service zookeeper-server stop command on some
   systest boxes.
   2.

   Edit zkServer.sh and in the following section:

   start)
       echo  -n "Starting zookeeper ... "
       if [ -f $ZOOPIDFILE ]; then
         if kill -0 `cat $ZOOPIDFILE` > /dev/null 2>&1; then
            echo $command already running as process `cat $ZOOPIDFILE`.
            exit 0
         fi
       fi
       nohup $JAVA "-Dzookeeper.log.dir=${ZOO_LOG_DIR}"
"-Dzookeeper.root.logger=${ZOO_LOG4J_PROP}" \
       -cp "$CLASSPATH" $JVMFLAGS $ZOOMAIN "$ZOOCFG" >
"$_ZOO_DAEMON_OUT" 2>&1 < /dev/null &

   Add the line
-Dzookeeper.DigestAuthenticationProvider.superDigest=super:lK75jTNcA+U9vtVEw5vB51mj/w4=
   \ within the $JAVA invocation such that the resulting section looks like
   this:

   start)
       echo  -n "Starting zookeeper ... "
       if [ -f $ZOOPIDFILE ]; then
         if kill -0 `cat $ZOOPIDFILE` > /dev/null 2>&1; then
            echo $command already running as process `cat $ZOOPIDFILE`.
            exit 0
         fi
       fi
       nohup $JAVA "-Dzookeeper.log.dir=${ZOO_LOG_DIR}"
"-Dzookeeper.root.logger=${ZOO_LOG4J_PROP}" \
       -Dzookeeper.DigestAuthenticationProvider.superDigest=super:lK75jTNcA+U9vtVEw5vB51mj/w4=
\
       -cp "$CLASSPATH" $JVMFLAGS $ZOOMAIN "$ZOOCFG" >
"$_ZOO_DAEMON_OUT" 2>&1 < /dev/null &

   3. Start ZooKeeper again.
   4. Log into ZooKeeper via zkCli.sh
   5. Declare yourself the root user with the following addauth command:

   addauth digest super:secret

   6. You should now be able to delete any node and/or change any ACL
   within the ZooKeeper system.
Note that you should *NOT* set this setting up on any production system.
If you need to set up a root user on a production system, you need to
create a different digest (the super:lK75jTNcA+U9vtVEw5vB51mj/w4=stuff
above is a "digest") linked to a better password than "secret".  To make
your own digest, use the $SQRRL_HOME/tools/useful-scripts/zk-digest.sh
 script.

On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 11:39 AM, Keith Turner <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
*Michael Allen*
Software Architect | Sqrrl-----------------------------------130
Prospect Street | Cambridge, MA 02139415.699.0106 | www.sqrrl.com

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