5 Minute Recipe: Heroku Log Drain Setup

Since we wrote about how to ship Heroku Logs to ELK we’ve received good feedback from Heroku users and, encouraged by that feedback, deployed a log ingestion service for apps running on Heroku. This makes it super easy to get structured Heroku Logs into Logsene, the hosted ELK logging service.  Let’s see how that’s done in under five minutes (check the current time!):

Step 1 – Create your Logsene App

If you don’t have a Logsene account already simply get a free account and create a Logsene App. This will get you a Logsene Application Token.

Step 2 – Configure Log Drain for your Heroku App

Once you create your Logsene app you’ll see a command to set up the Heroku Log Drain including the Logsene Token.

Simply copy that command and run it in one of the two places:

  1. in the Heroku app directory, like this:

heroku drain:add https://logsene-heroku-receiver.sematext.com/LOGSENE_TOKEN

  1. alternatively, specify your app name in the command instead of calling the command from your Heroku app directory:

heroku drain:add https://logsene-heroku-receiver.sematext.com/LOGSENE_TOKEN -a YOUR_HEROKU_APP_NAME

Step 3 – Watch your Logs in Logsene

If you now access your Heroku App, Heroku should log your HTTP request and a few seconds later the logs will be visible in Logsene.  And not in just any format!  You’ll see PERFECTLY STRUCTURED HEROKU LOGS:

heroku-logs-in-logsene

Parsed Heroku Logs in Logsene

 

Check the time!  Under five minutes?  If you like your Heroku app logs in Logsene tweet us your setup time. 🙂

Sematext Elastic Stack Training

Elasticsearch / Elastic Stack Training – NYC June 13-16

Next month, June 13-16, 2016, we will be running three Elastic Stack (aka ELK Stack) classes in New York City:

  1. June 13 & 14: Elasticsearch for Developers Training Workshop
  2. June 15: Elasticsearch Operations Training Workshop
  3. June 16: Elasticsearch for Logging Training Workshop

All classes cover Elasticsearch 2.x as well as Elasticsearch 5.x!

You can see the complete course outlines under Training Overview.  All three classes include lots of valuable hands-on exercises.  Be prepared to learn a lot!

Cost:

  • 2-day course: $1,200 early bird rate (valid through June 1) and $1,500 afterwards.
  • 1-day course: $700 early bird rate (valid through June 1) and $800 afterwards.

There’s also a 50% discount for the purchase of a 2nd seat!

Location:
462 7th Avenue, New York, NY 10018 – see map

If you have any questions please get in touch.

Sematext Solr Training

Apache Solr Training in NYC June 13-14

If you’ve missed our Core Solr training in October 2015 in New York, here is another chance – we’re running the 2-day Core Solr class again next month – June 13 & 14, 2016.
This course covers Solr 5.x as well as Solr 6.x!  You can see the complete course outline under Solr & Elasticsearch Training Overview . The course is very comprehensive — it includes over 20 chapters and lots of hands-on exercises.  Be prepared to learn a lot!

Cost:
$1,200 early bird rate (valid through June 1) and $1,500 afterwards.

There’s also a 50% discount for the purchase of a 2nd seat!

Location:

462 7th Avenue, New York, NY 10018 – see map

If you have any questions please get in touch.  To sign up, just register here.

reindex data

DocValues Reindexing with Solr Streaming Expressions

Last time, when talking about Solr 6 we learned how to use streaming expressions to automatically update data in a collection. You can imagine this is not the only cool thing you can do with streaming expressions. Today, we will see how to re-index data in your collection for fields that are using doc values. For that we will use Solr 6.1, because of a simple bug that was fixed for that version (details SOLR-9015)

Let’s assume we have two collections – one called video, which will be the source of the data. The second collection will be video_new and will be the target collection. We assume that collections will have slightly different structure – slightly different field names. The video collection will have the following fields:

  • id – document identifier
  • url – URL of the video
  • likes – number of likes
  • views – number of views

The second collection, video_new, will have the following fields:

  • id – document identifier
  • url – URL of the video
  • num_likes – number of likes
  • num_views – number of views

Exporting the data

First thing we need to figure out is a way to export data from the source collection in an efficient fashion. We can’t just set the rows parameter to gazillion, because it is not efficient and can lead to Solr going out of memory. So we will use the /export request handler. The only limitation of that request handler is that data needs to be sorted and needs to use doc values. That is not a problem for our data, however you should be aware of this requirement.

We will start by exporting the data using the standard Solr way – using the request params with the /export handler. The request looks like this:

curl -XGET 'localhost:8983/solr/video/export?q=*:*&sort=id+desc&fl=id,url,likes,views'

The above will result in Solr using the /export handler and returning all data, not only the first page of the results.

However, we want to use streaming expressions to re-index the data. Because of that we can change the above request to use the search streaming expression, which looks as follows:

search(
  video,
  zkHost="localhost:9983",
  qt="/export",
  q="*:*",
  fl="id,url,likes,views",
  sort="id desc")

The working command with the request looks like this:

curl --data-urlencode 'expr=search(video,zkHost="localhost:9983",qt="/export",q="*:*",fl="id,url,likes,views",sort="id desc")' http://localhost:8983/solr/video/stream

We use the search streaming expression and provide the name of the collection, which is video in our case, the ZooKeeper host (yes, we can read from other clusters), the name of the request handler which is /export in our case and is required. Finally, we provide the match-all query, the list of fields that we are interested in, and the sorting expression. Please remember that when using the /export handler all fields listed in the fl parameter must use doc values.

Changing field names

Our collections have different field names and because of that the above search request is not enough. We need to alter the name of the fields by using the select streaming expression. We will change the name of the likes field to num_likes and the name of the views field to num_views. The expression that does that is:

select(
  search(video,zkHost="localhost:9983",qt="/export",q="*:*",fl="id,url,likes,views",sort="id desc"),
  id, 
  url, 
  likes as num_likes,
  views as num_views
)

The select streaming expression lets us choose which fields should be used in the resulting tuples and how they will be named. In our case we take the id and url fields as is and we change the name of the likes and views fields.

To test the result of that expression you can simply use the following command:

curl --data-urlencode 'expr=select(search(video,zkHost="localhost:9983",qt="/export",q="*:*",fl="id,url,likes,views",sort="id desc"),id,url,likes as num_likes,views as num_views)' http://localhost:8983/solr/video/stream

Running the re-indexing

Finally, we have the data prepared and read in an efficient way, so we can send data to Solr for indexation. We do that using the update streaming expression simply by specifying the target collection name and the batch size, like this:

update(
  video_new, 
  batchSize=100, 
  select(search(video,zkHost="localhost:9983",qt="/export",q="*:*",fl="id,url,likes,views",sort="id desc"),id,url,likes as num_likes,views as num_views))

And the command that we would send to Solr:

curl --data-urlencode 'expr=update(video_new,batchSize=100,select(search(video,zkHost="localhost:9983",qt="/export",q="*:*",fl="id,url,likes,views",sort="id desc"),id,url,likes as num_likes,views as num_views))' http://localhost:8983/solr/video/stream

Please note that we send the command to the source collection /stream handler – in our case to the video collection. This is important.

Verifying the re-indexation

Once the task has been finished by Solr we can check the number of documents returned by each collection to verify that data has been re-indexed properly. We can do that by running these commands:

curl -XGET 'localhost:8983/solr/video/select?q=*:*&indent=true&rows=0'

and

curl -XGET 'localhost:8983/solr/video_new/select?q=*:*&indent=true&rows=0'

Both result in the following number of documents:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<response>

<lst name="responseHeader">
  <bool name="zkConnected">true</bool>
  <int name="status">0</int>
  <int name="QTime">38</int>
  <lst name="params">
    <str name="q">*:*</str>
    <str name="indent">true</str>
    <str name="rows">0</str>
  </lst>
</lst>
<result name="response" numFound="18" start="0">
</result>
</response>

And that means that everything works as intended 🙂

Interested in Solr Streaming Expressions? Subscribe to this blog or follow @sematext – we have more Streaming Expressions blog posts in the queue. If you need any help with Solr / SolrCloud – don’t forget @sematext does Solr Consulting, Production Support, as well as Solr Training!

rsyslog Elasticsearch reindex multiple scripts(3)

Scalable and Flexible Elasticsearch Reindexing via rsyslog

Earlier on, we posted a recipe on reindexing data from within an Elasticsearch 2.3+ cluster. But this doesn’t work if you want to reindex in a different cluster or if your Elasticsearch is older than 2.3. Or both, when you’re trying to migrate from 1.x to 2.x or later.

For such cases, we posted a Logstash reindexing recipe. However, Logstash can sometimes become a bottleneck, so we needed something faster for indexing lots of data. We turned to rsyslog, a log shipper with performance as its #1 feature.

The plan

As rsyslog doesn’t have an Elasticsearch input like Logstash does, we’ve used an external application to scroll through Elasticsearch documents and push them to rsyslog via TCP. The flow would be:

rsyslog to Elasticsearch reindex flow

This is an easy way to extend rsyslog, using whichever language you’re comfortable with, to support more inputs. Here, we piggyback on the TCP input. You can do a similar job with filters/parsers – you can find some examples here – by piggybacking the mmexternal module, which uses stdout&stdin for communication. The same is possible for outputs, normally added via the omprog module: we did this to add a Solr output and one for SPM custom metrics.

The custom script in question doesn’t have to be multi-threaded, you can simply spin up more of them, scrolling different indices. In this particular case, using two scripts gave us slightly better throughput, saturating the network:

rsyslog to Elasticsearch reindex flow multiple scripts

Writing the custom script

Before starting to write the script, one needs to know how the messages sent to rsyslog would look like. To be able to index data, rsyslog will need an index name, a type name and optionally an ID. In this particular case, we were dealing with logs, so the ID wasn’t necessary.

With this in mind, I see a number of ways of sending data to rsyslog:

  • one big JSON per line. One can use mmnormalize to parse that JSON, which then allows rsyslog do use values from within it as index name, type name, and so on
  • for each line, begin with the bits of “extra data” (like index and type names) then put the JSON document that you want to reindex. Again, you can use mmnormalize to parse, but this time you can simply trust that the last thing is a JSON and send it to Elasticsearch directly, without the need to parse it
  • if you only need to pass two variables (index and type name, in this case), you can piggyback on the vague spec of RFC3164 syslog and send something like
    destination_index document_type:{"original": "document"}
    

This last option will parse the provided index name in the hostname variable, the type in syslogtag and the original document in msg. A bit hacky, I know, but quite convenient (makes the rsyslog configuration straightforward) and very fast, since we know the RFC3164 parser is very quick and it runs on all messages anyway. No need for mmnormalize, unless you want to change the document in-flight with rsyslog.

Below you can find the Python code that can scan through existing documents in an index (or index pattern, like logstash_2016.05.*) and push them to rsyslog via TCP. You’ll need the Python Elasticsearch client (pip install elasticsearch) and you’d run it like this:

python elasticsearch_to_rsyslog.py source_index destination_index

The script being:

from elasticsearch import Elasticsearch
import json, socket, sys

source_cluster = ['server1', 'server2']
rsyslog_address = '127.0.0.1'
rsyslog_port = 5514

es = Elasticsearch(source_cluster,
      retry_on_timeout=True,
      max_retries=10)
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.connect((rsyslog_address, rsyslog_port))


result = es.search(index=sys.argv[1], scroll='1m', search_type='scan', size=500)

while True:
  res = es.scroll(scroll_id=result['_scroll_id'], scroll='1m')
  for hit in result['hits']['hits']:
    s.send(sys.argv[2] + ' ' + hit["_type"] + ':' + json.dumps(hit["_source"])+'\n')
  if not result['hits']['hits']:
    break

s.close()

If you need to modify messages, you can parse them in rsyslog via mmjsonparse and then add/remove fields though rsyslog’s scripting language. Though I couldn’t find a nice way to change field names – for example to remove the dots that are forbidden since Elasticsearch 2.0 – so I did that in the Python script:

def de_dot(my_dict):
  for key, value in my_dict.iteritems():
    if '.' in key:
      my_dict[key.replace('.','_')] = my_dict.pop(key)
    if type(value) is dict:
      my_dict[key] = de_dot(my_dict.pop(key))
  return my_dict

And then the “send” line becomes:

s.send(sys.argv[2] + ' ' + hit["_type"] + ':' + json.dumps(de_dot(hit["_source"]))+'\n')

Configuring rsyslog

The first step here is to make sure you have the lastest rsyslog, though the config below works with versions all the way back to 7.x (which can be found in most Linux distributions). You just need to make sure the rsyslog-elasticsearch package is installed, because we need the Elasticsearch output module.

# messages bigger than this are truncated
$maxMessageSize 10000000  # ~10MB

# load the TCP input and the ES output modules
module(load="imtcp")
module(load="omelasticsearch")

main_queue(
  # buffer up to 1M messages in memory
  queue.size="1000000"
  # these threads process messages and send them to Elasticsearch
  queue.workerThreads="4"
  # rsyslog processes messages in batches to avoid queue contention
  # this will also be the Elasticsearch bulk size
  queue.dequeueBatchSize="4000"
)

# we use templates to specify how the data sent to Elasticsearch looks like
template(name="document" type="list"){
  # the "msg" variable contains the document
  property(name="msg")
}
template(name="index" type="list"){
  # "hostname" has the index name
  property(name="hostname")
}
template(name="type" type="list"){
  # "syslogtag" has the type name
  property(name="syslogtag")
}

# start the TCP listener on the port we pointed the Python script to
input(type="imtcp" port="5514")

# sending data to Elasticsearch, using the templates defined earlier
action(type="omelasticsearch"
  template="document"
  dynSearchIndex="on" searchIndex="index"
  dynSearchType="on" searchType="type"
  server="localhost"  # destination Elasticsearch host
  serverport="9200"   # and port
  bulkmode="on"  # use the bulk API
  action.resumeretrycount="-1"  # retry indefinitely if Elasticsearch is unreachable
)

This configuration doesn’t have to disturb your local syslog (i.e. by replacing /etc/rsyslog.conf). You can put it someplace else and run a different rsyslog process:

rsyslogd -i /var/run/rsyslog_reindexer.pid -f /home/me/rsyslog_reindexer.conf

And that’s it! With rsyslog started, you can start the Python script(s) and do the reindexing.

If you need any help with Elasticsearch, rsyslog, Logstash and the like, check out our Elasticsearch consulting, Logging consulting, Elasticsearch production support and Elasticsearch and Logging training info.

solr streaming expressions

Solr Streaming Expressions for Collection auto-updating

One of the things that was extensively changed in Solr 6.0 are the Streaming Expressions and what we can do with them (hint: amazing stuff!). We already described Solr SQL support. Today, we’ll dig into the functionality that makes Solr SQL support possible – the Streaming Expressions. Using Streaming Expressions we will put together a mechanism that lets us re-index data in a given Solr Collection – all within Solr, without any external moving parts or dependencies.

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technology_partners_monitoring_image_0 (2)

Sematext is Docker Ecosystem Technology Partner (ETP) for Monitoring

technology_partners_monitoring_image_0 (2)May 5 2016 — Sematext, a global, Brooklyn-based products and services company that builds innovative Cloud and On Premises solutions for application performance monitoring, log management and analytics, today announced that it has been recognized by Docker as the Ecosystem Technology Partner (ETP) for monitoring and logging. This designation indicates that SPM Performance Monitoring and Logsene have demonstrated working integration with the Docker platform via the Docker API and are available to users and organizations that seek solutions to monitor their Dockerized distributed applications.

Sematext Docker Agent is extremely easy to deploy on  Docker Swarm, Docker Cloud and Docker Datacenter. It discovers new and existing containers, collects Docker performance metrics, events and logs, and runs in a tiny container on every Docker Host. In addition to standard log collection functionality the agent performs automatic log format detection and field extraction for a number of log formats, including Docker Swarm, Elasticsearch, Solr, Nginx, Apache, MongoDB, Kubernetes, etc.  

Sematext Docker Agent

Many organizations invest a lot of time in monitoring and logging setups because monitoring and logging changed dramatically with the introduction of Docker and related orchestration tools. We’ve observed that organizations and teams that use different tools for logging and monitoring often have difficulties correlating logs, events and metrics. Sematext automates performance monitoring and logging for Docker. Operational insights  are provided in a single UI, which helps one efficiently correlate metrics, logs and events. Sematext Docker Agent detects many log formats and structures the logs automatically for analysis in Logsene.

We would like to congratulate Sematext on their inclusion into Docker’s Ecosystem Technology Partner program for logging and monitoring,” said Nick Stinemates, VP of Business Development and Technical Alliances. “The ETP program recognizes organizations like Sematext that have demonstrated integration with the Docker platform to provide users with intelligent insights and increased visibility into their Dockerized environments. The goal is to provide users with the data needed to ensure the highest degree of availability and performance for all their business-critical applications”.

Sematext SPM is available at http://sematext.com/spm

About Sematext

Sematext Group, Inc. is a global, Brooklyn-based products and services company that builds innovative Cloud and On Premises solutions for application performance monitoring, log management and analytics, and site search analytics. Sematext Docker Agent is extremely easy to deploy; it collects Docker performance metrics, events and logs and runs in a container on every Docker Host. In addition to standard log collection functionality the agent performs automatic log format detection and field extraction for a number of log formats.  Besides monitoring Docker, Sematext SPM agents also monitor applications running inside and outside containers, such as Elasticsearch, Nginx, Apache, Kafka, Cassandra, Spark, Node.js, MongoDB, Solr, MySQL, etc.

Sematext also provides professional services around Elasticsearch, the ELK / Elastic Stack, and Apache Solr – Consulting, Training, and Production Support.

Contacts: press@sematext.com

jdbc driver

Solr 6 as JDBC Data Source

Last week, in the Solr 6, SolrCloud and SQL Queries post, we described how the recent release of Solr 6 in its SolrCloud mode is able to understand SQL. But this is not the only SolrCloud / Solr 6. Another addition that we can use is the Solr JDBC driver. We can use it just like any other JDBC driver. In this blog post we will show how to use Solr JDBC driver from our code, which should give you an idea of how to proceed when using this functionality elsewhere, say with Apache Zeppelin or any other data exploration or visualization tool that has JDBC support.

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23 rules logstash up cpu

Elasticsearch Ingest Node vs Logstash Performance

Starting from Elasticsearch 5.0, you’ll be able to define pipelines within it that process your data, in the same way you’d normally do it with something like Logstash. We decided to take it for a spin and see how this new functionality (called Ingest) compares with Logstash filters in both performance and functionality.

Specifically, we tested the grok processor on Apache common logs (we love logs here), which can be parsed with a single rule, and on CISCO ASA firewall logs, for which we have 23 rules. This way we could also check how both Ingest and Logstash scale when you start adding more rules.

Baseline performance

To get a baseline, we pushed logs with Filebeat 5.0alpha1 directly to Elasticsearch, without parsing them in any way. We used an AWS c3.large for Filebeat (2 vCPU) and a c3.xlarge for Elasticsearch (4 vCPU). We also installed SPM to monitor Elasticsearch’s performance.

It turned out that network was the bottleneck, which is why pushing raw logs doesn’t saturate the CPU:
raw logs CPU

Even though we got a healthy throughput rate of 12-14K EPS:
raw logs throughput

But raw, unparsed logs are rarely useful. Ideally, you’d log in JSON and push directly to Elasticsearch. Conveniently, Filebeat can parse JSON since 5.0. That said, throughput dropped to about 4K EPS because JSON logs are bigger and saturate the network:
Throughput of JSON logs

CPU dropped as well, but not that much because now Elasticsearch has to do more work (more fields to index):
JSON logs CPU

This 4K EPS throughput/40 percent CPU ratio is the most efficient way to send logs to Elasticsearch – if you can log in JSON. If you can’t, you’ll need to parse them. So we added another c3.xl instance (4 vCPUs) to do the parsing, first with Logstash, then with a separate Elasticsearch dedicated Ingest node.

Logstash

With Logstash 5.0 in place, we pointed Filebeat to it, while tailing the raw Apache logs file. On the Logstash side, we have a beats listener, a grok filter and an Elasticsearch output:

input {
  beats {
    port => 5044
  }
}

filter {
   grok {
     match => ["message", "%{COMMONAPACHELOG}%{GREEDYDATA:additional_fields}"]
   }
}

output {
  elasticsearch {
    hosts => "10.154.238.233:9200"
    workers => 4
  }
}

The default number of 2 pipeline workers seemed enough, but we’ve specified more output workers to make up for the time each of them waits for Elasticsearch to reply. That said, network was again the bottleneck so throughput was capped at 4K EPS like with JSON logs:
Logstash apache logs throughput

Meanwhile, Logstash used just about the same amount of CPU as Elasticsearch, at 40-50%:
Logstash apache logs CPU usage

Then we parsed CISCO ASA logs. The config looks similar, except there were 23 grok rules instead of one. Logstash handled the load surprisingly well – throughput was again capped by the network, slightly lower than before because JSONs were bigger:
Logstash CISCO ASA grok throughput

While CPU usage only increased to 60-70%:
Logstash CISCO ASA CPU usage

This means the throughput-to-CPU ratio only went down by about 1.5x after adding a lot more rules. However, in both cases Logstash proved pretty heavy, using about the same CPU to parse the data as Elasticsearch used for indexing it. Let’s see if the Ingest node can do better.

Ingest node

We used the same c3.xl instance for Ingest node tests: we’ve set node.master and node.data to false in its elasticsearch.yml, to make sure it only does grok and nothing else. We’ve also set node.ingest to false of the data node, so it can focus on indexing.

Next step was to define a pipeline that does the grok processing on the Ingest node:

curl -XPOST localhost:9200/_ingest/pipeline/apache?pretty -d '{
  "description": "grok apache logs",
  "processors": [
    {
      "grok": {
        "field": "message",
        "pattern": "%{COMMONAPACHELOG}%{GREEDYDATA:additional_fields}"
      }
    }
  ]
}'

Then, to trigger the pipeline for a certain document/bulk, we added the name of the defined pipeline to the HTTP parameters like pipeline=apache. We used curl this time for indexing, but you can add various parameters in Filebeat, too.

With Apache logs, the throughput numbers were nothing short of impressive (12-16K EPS):
ingest node apache logs grok throughput

This used up all the CPU on the data node, while the ingest node was barely breaking a sweat at 15%:
ingest node grok apache logs CPU usage

Because Filebeat only sent raw logs to Elasticsearch (specifically, the dedicated Ingest node), there was less strain on the network. The Ingest node, on the other hand, also acted like a client node, distributing the logs (now parsed) to the appropriate shards, using the node-to-node transport protocol. Overall, the Ingest node provided ~10x better CPU-to-throughput ratio than Logstash.

Things still look better, but not this dramatic, with CISCO ASA logs. We have multiple sub-types of logs here, and therefore multiple grok rules. With Logstash, you can specify an array of match directives:

grok {
  match => [
   "cisco_message", "%{CISCOFW106001}",
   "cisco_message", "%{CISCOFW106006_106007_106010}",
...

There’s no such thing for Ingest node yet, so you need to define one rule, and then use the on_failure block to define another grok rule (effectively saying “if this rule doesn’t match, try that one”) and keep nesting like that until you’re done:

"grok": {
  "field": "cisco_message",
  "pattern": "%{CISCOFW106001}",
  "on_failure": [
    {
      "grok": {
      "field": "cisco_message",
      "pattern": "%{CISCOFW106006_106007_106010}",
      "on_failure": [...

The other problem is performance. Because now there are up to 23 rules to evaluate, throughput goes down to about 10K EPS:
Ingest node CISCO ASA grok throughput

And the CPU bottleneck shifts to the Ingest node:
Ingest node CISCO ASA grok CPU

Overall, the throughput-to-CPU ratio of the Ingest node dropped by a factor of 9 compared to the Apache logs scenario.

Conclusions

  • Logstash is easier to configure, at least for now, and performance didn’t deteriorate as much when adding rules
  • Ingest node is lighter across the board. For a single grok rule, it was about 10x faster than Logstash
  • Ingest nodes can also act as “client” nodes
  • Define the grok rules matching most logs first, because both Ingest and Logstash exit the chain on the first match by default

You’ve made it all the way down here? Bravo! If you need any help with Elasticsearch – don’t forget @sematext does Elasticsearch Consulting, Production Support, as well as Elasticsearch Training.

cdcr

Solr 6 Cross-Data Center Replication

With the recent release of Solr 6.0, we got a host of new functionalities users have been anxiously waiting for. We’ve got the Parallel SQL over MapReduce that we recently blogged about, the new default similarity model, changes to the default similarity model configuration, the graph query and the cross-data center replication. We will slowly discuss all of the features of new Solr version, but today we will look at the cross-data center replication functionality, how it works, how to set it up and what to keep in mind when using it.

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